Christophe-Lemaire11

1990

CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE

When people mention the ” French touch* ” they could be talking about the style and attitude of Christophe Lemaire. This designer, who left the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs after a year of preparatory studies, loves to play guest DJ. His collections move to the rhythms and accents of disco and funk, mixed with African and Asian references that mingle happily with ideas borrowed from the traditional European wardrobe. The precision of the cuts evokes ” tailor-made ” quality.

He studied alongside some of fashion’s biggest names, learning from Christian Lacroix, Jean Patou, Yves Saint Laurent and Thierry Mugler. After spending four years at Christian Lacroix, Lemaire decided to spread his wings in the fashion world and in 1990 he launched his own label.

After a collaboration with Ramosport and Dorothée Bis, he submitted a brilliant proposal to ANDAM. The fellowship he received enabled him to create his own label and to show his first collection in 1990. In 1994, he was awarded the grand prix of the City of Paris for the men’s collection which he had just launched. The following year, ANDAM encouraged this development toward men’s fashion by granting him a second fellowship.

In 1999, with the backing of Japanese partners, Lemaire opened a new, more centrally located store on Rue de Sévigné, whose well-lit decor reflects his taste for Japanese culture.

In May 2001 Lemaire became creative director of heritage sportswear brand Lacoste. In ten years, he re-established the company’s position on the fashion map and was able to revive its classics, taking the original mark and mixing it with his pop-modern universe of ideas. In June 2001, under his direction, Lacoste staged its first catwalk show.

In 2007, Christophe Lemaire came back strong with his eponymous label. Inspired by the Japanese style of the 70’s, his label introduced light and flattering clothing for both men and women.

Since 2011, he is artistic director of the women RTW for the Hermes house.